The Grail Tree

The Grail Tree

Jonathan Gash / Dec 09, 2019

The Grail Tree In the world of antiques the Holy Grail is a holy terror for almost every month someone claims to possess the original So when an inebriated ex clergyman confided to Lovejoy that he did indeed possess

  • Title: The Grail Tree
  • Author: Jonathan Gash
  • ISBN: 9780451821867
  • Page: 222
  • Format: Paperback
  • In the world of antiques the Holy Grail is a holy terror for almost every month someone claims to possess the original So when an inebriated ex clergyman confided to Lovejoy that he did indeed possess the cup, the resourceful antiques dealer knew just what to make of such a statement.The trouble was that someone else thought this version of the Grail was worth stealingIn the world of antiques the Holy Grail is a holy terror for almost every month someone claims to possess the original So when an inebriated ex clergyman confided to Lovejoy that he did indeed possess the cup, the resourceful antiques dealer knew just what to make of such a statement.The trouble was that someone else thought this version of the Grail was worth stealing and now the owner was dead amid considerable carnage.

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      Posted by:Jonathan Gash
      Published :2019-09-20T19:13:25+00:00

    About "Jonathan Gash"

      • Jonathan Gash

        John Grant is an English crime writer, who writes under the pen name Jonathan Gash He is the author of the Lovejoy series of novels He wrote the novel The Incomer under the pen name Graham Gaunt.Grant is a doctor by training and worked as a general practitioner and pathologist He served in the British Army and attained the rank of Major in the Royal Army Medical Corps He was head of bacteriology at the School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine for the University of London between 1971 and 1988.Grant won the John Creasey Award in 1977 for his first Lovejoy novel, The Judas Pair He is also the author of a series of medical thrillers featuring the character Dr Clare Burtonall.Grant lives outside Colchester in Essex, the setting for many of his novels He has also been published in Postscripts.


    844 Comments

    1. To the Chinese god Kuan Ti, guardian of antique dealers and pawnshops, this book is most sincerely and respectfully dedicated.The third of a set of three Black dagger crime Hardcovers I acquired and were the sole reason for revisiting the world of Lovejoy antique dealer extra-ordinaire. The man who can feel an real antique and yet be so oblivious when it comes to women something he has more of in his life than currency.This book is about Lovejoy getting a new student/intern, something he gets pa [...]


    2. I read this book years and years ago and remembered enjoying the series, if not for Lovejoy, who always came off as not respecting women all that much and a bit of a not nice type of guy, but because the mysteries were interesting, centering around antiques. I like how there would be a little bit of information about certain antiques, and even how someone might be able to counterfeit one. However, fast-forward to the present and now I find myself just not enjoying this story. Between Lovejoy and [...]


    3. I'm not sure why I like Lovejoy so much. He is misogynistic, selfish and obsessed with antiques. But it is this passion for his subject that makes him so attractive. He is unashamedly his own man, knows what he wants and will do whatever it takes to get it. He is a good friend and protector, so long as that doesn't get in the way of his primary purpose in life, which is always antiques. I enjoyed this story, but it went on a bit towards the end when it could have been brought to a conclusion muc [...]


    4. Ah, Lovejoy he's always after women and antiques and destined to screw up at both. Why women run after him is beyond me--I'm a woman and see no attraction (and the book Lovejoy sees nothing wrong in "clouting" them, which is awful). However, Lovejoy is always *interesting*--an over-the-top, somewhat sleazy guy with an incredible store of knowledge about antiques. We don't necessarily want to invite him to dinner, but I enjoy reading about his adventures and learning his views on obscure antique [...]


    5. Wonderful story. I was glad that we finally have confirmation that he did rebuild his cottage, clearly putting this novel after The Judas Pair, and so I believe these novels are actually put out in chronological order. I very much liked the characters introduced (Henry, Martha, Honkworth, Lydia, etc.) though I think the villain could have used a little more exploring. Unlike the first couple of novels, nobody close to Lovejoy got killed so there was less of the revenge plotline. He was still qui [...]


    6. I believe that Lovejoy is meant to be a lovable rogue, so it's a shame that he comes off as a selfish misogynist instead, which means his motivation for getting involved in solving the murder seems murky and unclear.There seemed to be an awful lot of characters in this book - most of whom felt like they were there for local colour, and didn't service many plot requirements. I got some of them confused, at one point thinking Lovejoy was meeting a new character in a bar, when in actual fact he was [...]


    7. While I enjoy Lovejoy as a television series and I appreciate that he is still a cheeky chappie when doing his antique deals, this book leaves me completely cold.Lovejoy still comes over as a lady killer, full of charm and ever ready to make a quick few pounds in any way that he can but the storyline of this book is disjointed, difficult to follow and completely uninteresting.Lovejoy is searching for a Holy Grail tree (I think) and he gets into a variety of scrapes as he attempts to find it. He [...]


    8. Unfortunately, I found this entry into the Lovejoy series just an OK listen. I still stand by many of the things I said before - the slang, Lovejoy's rudeness to women, etc. However, having 2 of these stories under my belt, I was able to understand a bit more of the slang and his poor treatment of women? Well, it is evident in all the books so really shouldn't come as any surprise.What I did find was that this story was pretty slow moving and even the confrontation at the end was just ho-hum. It [...]


    9. East Anglian antiques dealer Lovejoy (no first name) tries to solve the murder of a Reverend in possession of the Holy Grail. Gash's writing is too snarky and slangy to be enjoyable, and Lovejoy too much of a horndog. There were more characters than I could be bothered to keep track of, so when Lovejoy punched a woman in a pubfight and ripped the back of her dress open (whilst noting that vintage Victorian dresses would hold together better), I had forgotten this woman was the niece of the Rever [...]


    10. This was an interesting book. It's an older book and I believe it's part of a series. I really liked how the author would take parts and talk to the reader. Also, I thought it was hilarious when he would talk about women in the book. You could tell this is from another generation. The book was all about antiques. I didn't think it would be that interesting but it really was. The author had a great way of including different antique items and then work them into a great part of the story. I'm sor [...]


    11. Don't start your Lovejoy introduction with this onehe's clouted a woman in the first few pages and is super misogynist and 'orrible the whole way through. I didn't enjoy this as much as Gold from Gemini but I am looking forward to other books in the series.It's still enjoyable! I love the slang, the scatterings of historical notes and antique specific stuff, the descriptions of rural East Anglia, the characters and Lovejoy's asides to the reader. I can never keep up with the string of women who [...]


    12. I really enjoy these novels, not sure why I never really got into the tv series that was based on them but I suppose that has more to do with interests of the time and the fact that books tend to outshine their small and big screen adaptations. I didn't enjoy the ending as much with this book but the unfailing English humour and weel spun story kept me interested till the end. Having read a couple from this series already I would say that this one is my least favorite but not so poor that I woul [...]


    13. Another engaging, entertaining and charmingly offbeat medium-boiled mystery set in the world of shady antiques trade around East Anglia, on the British coast. Wonderfully written, full of wit and even some wisdom, this is heartily recommended to both those who have and who have not read other adventures featuring Jonathan Gash’s rogue dealer, Lovejoy.


    14. I used to enjoy watching the TV series but I just realized I don't like the book version of Lovejoy at all. He's basically just an asshole, no better than the killers he's catching. And I fail to see any moral values - why is this in print?




    15. Lovejoy is put on the trail if a very important, but unbelievable, relic. Then nasty things begin happening. CID are on the case, but he doesn't trust them.




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