War under Heaven: Pontiac, the Indian Nations, and the British Empire

War under Heaven: Pontiac, the Indian Nations, and the British Empire

Gregory Evans Dowd / Feb 24, 2020

War under Heaven Pontiac the Indian Nations and the British Empire The Treaty of Paris ceded much of the continent east of the Mississippi to Great Britain a claim which the Indian nations of the Great Lakes who suddenly found themselves under British rule co

  • Title: War under Heaven: Pontiac, the Indian Nations, and the British Empire
  • Author: Gregory Evans Dowd
  • ISBN: 9780801878923
  • Page: 174
  • Format: Paperback
  • The 1763 Treaty of Paris ceded much of the continent east of the Mississippi to Great Britain, a claim which the Indian nations of the Great Lakes, who suddenly found themselves under British rule, considered outrageous Unlike the French, with whom Great Lakes Indians had formed an alliance of convenience, the British entered the upper Great Lakes in a spirit of conquest.The 1763 Treaty of Paris ceded much of the continent east of the Mississippi to Great Britain, a claim which the Indian nations of the Great Lakes, who suddenly found themselves under British rule, considered outrageous Unlike the French, with whom Great Lakes Indians had formed an alliance of convenience, the British entered the upper Great Lakes in a spirit of conquest British officers on the frontier keenly felt the need to assert their assumed superiority over both Native Americans and European settlers At the same time, Indian leaders expected appropriate tokens of British regard, gifts the British refused to give It is this issue of respect that, according to Gregory Dowd, lies at the root of the war the Ottawa chief Pontiac and his alliance of Great Lakes Indians waged on the British Empire between 1763 and 1767.In War under Heaven, Dowd boldly reinterprets the causes and consequences of Pontiac s War Where previous Anglocentric histories have ascribed this dramatic uprising to disputes over trade and land, this groundbreaking work traces the conflict back to status both the low regard in which the British held the Indians and the concern among Native American leaders about their people s standing and their sovereignty in the eyes of the British Pontiac s War also embodied a clash of world views, and Dowd examines the central role that Indian cultural practices and beliefs played in the conflict, explores the political and military culture of the British Empire which informed the attitudes its servants had toward Indians, provides deft and insightful portraits of Pontiac and his British adversaries, and offers a detailed analysis of the military and diplomatic strategies of both sides Imaginatively conceived and compellingly told, War under Heaven redefines our understanding of Anglo Indian relations in the colonial period.

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      Posted by:Gregory Evans Dowd
      Published :2019-08-06T02:19:04+00:00

    About "Gregory Evans Dowd"

      • Gregory Evans Dowd

        Gregory Evans Dowd is a professor of history and American culture at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.


    151 Comments

    1. An insightful, well-written and well-researched history of Pontiac’s war.The narrative devotes relatively little time to the fighting, concentrating more on diplomacy, the religious background, and general mood of the time.The narrative is readable, and Dowd’s rendition of Pontiac is clear and persuasive. Pontiac here comes off as very sympathetic and intelligent and he effectively uses Pontiac to explain the Indians’ grievances and culture. He also describes the situation in the Ohio Vall [...]


    2. I first located this book when I was driving a Pontiac. I decided to learn something about the man the car brand was named after. My guess is that this fairly-recent nonfiction book is the definitive history of "Pontiac's War" (circa 1763). Of particular interest are the contrasting relationships with Native peoples established first by the French and then the British. These events took place where I live--in the former "Northwest Territories"--and that adds to my historical interest. The city o [...]


    3. Dowd goes beyond the standard monographs that show land hungry English or vengeful Native Americans as the catalysts of Pontiac's war. By researching the relationships between a variety of Native American groups, the drastic change from French to English power, and the variety of religious groups, including tribal religion and prophets, French Catholicism and Moravian influences, Dowd breaks down the assumptions and disproves them. Pontiac was concerned with the status of his people, and the dis [...]


    4. I struggled to like this book, but after reading more than 100 pages I gave up. The author may have meant it as a scholarly work, but it's certainly not engaging. People and events are mentioned, almost in passing, that infer that reader should have as much knowledge as the author about these times and their people. It's also a rather Indian-centric work. Although I respect and admire the Native American people, I prefer an author without an axe to grind.I guess I expected something more engagin [...]


    5. Dowd focuses this work about Pontiac's War on the British Indian policy before, during, and after the War and the spiritual nature of the War for Pontiac. Dowd does not only focus on the causes, battles, and aftermath of the War but its implications on the larger world stage. The skipping around in chronology can make the book a bit harder to follow than others, but the sectional break up of information is helpful. The use of identity as a main cause of the War is excellent.


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