Psychotherapy East and West

Psychotherapy East and West

Alan W. Watts / Apr 07, 2020

Psychotherapy East and West What is the common ground between Western psychiatry and Eastern philosophy and what has each to learn from the other Alan Watts found a common principle that intentionally or otherwise seems to be

  • Title: Psychotherapy East and West
  • Author: Alan W. Watts
  • ISBN: 9780394716091
  • Page: 432
  • Format: Paperback
  • What is the common ground between Western psychiatry and Eastern philosophy, and what has each to learn from the other Alan Watts found a common principle that, intentionally or otherwise, seems to be used wherever therapy is trying to overcome man s false sense of himself as an isolated ego an ego that traps him in a perpetual flight from death and loneliness In varyWhat is the common ground between Western psychiatry and Eastern philosophy, and what has each to learn from the other Alan Watts found a common principle that, intentionally or otherwise, seems to be used wherever therapy is trying to overcome man s false sense of himself as an isolated ego an ego that traps him in a perpetual flight from death and loneliness In varying ways and degrees, both Eastern philosophy and Western psychotherapy engage the individual in experiments that vividly reveal the fallacy of this conception and give him a new feeling of identity.

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      Published :2020-01-21T04:14:33+00:00

    About "Alan W. Watts"

      • Alan W. Watts

        Alan Wilson Watts was a British philosopher, writer and speaker, who held both a Master s in Theology and a Doctorate of Divinity Famous for his research on comparative religion, he was best known as an interpreter and popularizer of Asian philosophies for a Western audience He wrote over 25 books and numerous articles on subjects such as personal identity, the true nature of reality, higher consciousness, the meaning of life, concepts and images of God and the non material pursuit of happiness In his books he relates his experience to scientific knowledge and to the teachings of Eastern and Western religion and philosophy.


    967 Comments

    1. In Psychotherapy East and West, Alan Watts compares eastern methods of liberation, specifically Buddhism, Taoism, Vedanta, and Yoga, with modern western methods, in particular the psychotherapeutic models pioneered by Freud and Jung. In a complex, lucid philosophical book of 214 pages, he finds, among other things, that the very urge toward liberation is problematic, since it presumes the existence of someone (the ego) who is not already liberated.Perhaps one of the most interesting claims Watts [...]


    2. With its initial release way back in 1961, Psychotherapy East and West by noted philosopher Alan Watts sought to examine the parallels between Western psychotherapy and Eastern philosophy. I must say it has aged well despite both areas of his interest transforming greatly in the 50+ years since the book first hit the presses.Psychotherapy East and West focuses on the methods and objectives of both segments and how they converge and contrast with one other. Watts’ overall goal with this book wa [...]


    3. This is certainly the most academic of Watts' books that I've come across, and it is perhaps the most theoretical. The book has an incredible number of philosophical and psychological sources, featuring many long quotes, which in my estimation make the book at least a third longer than it appears, and certainly more of a tough read. Before reading the book, I was surprised to discover how difficult it is to find and how expensive it is, but given these facts, I'm not that surprised now to find t [...]


    4. A very stimulating book, it took me a while to get through because it's dense and jam-packed with thoughtfulness. In comparing "eastern spiritual practices" and "western psychotherapy", attempting to show a way beyond the double-bind of erroneous mental captivity one easily finds oneself tied to, he comes up with the most poignant and sharp ways of expressing himself. Man, can he branch out! Two quotes: "Life is above all a spontaneous process, and, as we have seen, to command spontaneity, to sa [...]


    5. One of Alan Watts' more mediocre books, correlating Eastern philosophy of liberation with Western 70's-era psychology. Its main premise is that both address the suffering caused by the "double-bind" of social conditioning, which is basically the demand that we follow a strict system of rules while also being genuine, an impossible contradiction of expectations. This book is very old for such a new field as psychology, so it's limited to the theories of Freud, Jung, Carl Rogers, existentialism, a [...]


    6. Life is not a problem to be solved. Loved the focus on social double binds and how a therapist, or zen master will essentially become a mirror for the student. What a marvelous author watts is.


    7. what little of this book i was able to focus on was well-liked. the rest of it was cool too, i just didn't get it. not the authors fault.


    8. In the first chapter of Psychotherapy East and West he skates along big ideas, and typically in academia you're supposed to get into smaller chunks to make sure you've got it right. In some ways Watts is kind of refreshing and there are interesting insights, like that you're going to have to get into social commentary in psychotherapy.The second chapter is a mash up of physical theories, Wittgenstein and anthropology. The question whether good creates evil was raised, that was my favorite part b [...]


    9. Writing half a century ago, too many of Watt's contributions here have been forgotten or remain ignored by the fields psychology, education, counseling, and Western society writ large. Dear westerners, kill the ego already!In Psychotherapy East & West, Watts continues his challenge to the toxic mindset we westerners have inherited from our Judeo-Christian forebearers, particularly the uniquely American heritage found in 'The Protestant Work Ethic.' We create more problems for ourselves by as [...]


    10. First time I've got this book was when I searched for an alternative reading materials for cross-cultural psychology course in my university. initially I was a bit skeptical about the title. Mainly because of the use of dichotomous terminology which splitting 'the East' from 'the West'; this immediately reminded me of Edward Said's Orientalism. But after reading this book until the mid part, I learned that my suspicion was wrong. This book definitely awesome! Personally I thought this book gave [...]


    11. I have been lost recently and I have found myself in this book. Thank you Alan Watts for the perspective. It is a reminder of the most simple truth: that life is life, here and now, using copious amounts of dense research and specific examples and links to language, art, history, religion and politics to feed the intellectual and rational mind. So happy I randomly picked this book up off my grandfather's shelf.


    12. I have read this book dozens of times. Watts speaks from the perspective of someone who gained enlightenment, in the Buddhist sense, and so he speaks very personally about what that means for those of us who are still clinging to our finite selves. His words and concepts help you to peel away some of the masks that cover and obscure the light of your Soul.


    13. I read Watts' book in the late '60's. It planted seeds of thought that I continue to cultivate to this day. As a died in the wool Westerner, I continue to try (not always successfully) to integrate them. Westerners would all benefit from focusing more on acceptance and appreciation and less than on expectation and accumulation.


    14. here is in my opinion all of his work all his books into one little book. from zen to tao from Christianity to Mahayana from judo to Vedanta . he explains in no uncertain terms the mis approach of the west to understand a individual in its dualistic way . its division of labor and specialization and compartmentalization of applied science to grasp what is the mind . highly recommended


    15. Which of his books to recommend? Such a dilemma but I'll start with this one. He contrasts and compares the East's Buddhism with the West's psychotherapy. Each aims to change a person's concept of self in a particular way, and embodies a critique of the culture it's embedded in.


    16. Very mild, easy reading, but it also makes you think. Plenty of ideas for thought-experiments, all of which are more than worth performing. It's not a book I can re-read easily because so much of it seems common-sense after the first round, but still a very worthwhile read.


    17. This is terrific book that I have read several times in my life but it didn't really resonate as much as now. This is because I understand psychotherapy much differently after thirty years at it, and also have been learning about Buddhism and meditation. I recommend it to anyone.


    18. With its initial release way back in 1961, Psychotherapy East and West by noted philosopher Alan Watts sought to examine the parallels between Western psychotherapy and Eastern philosophy. I must say it has aged well despite both areas of his interest transforming greatly in the 50+ years since the book first hit the presses.Psychotherapy East and West focuses on the methods and objectives of both segments and how they converge and contrast with one other. Watts’ overall goal with this book wa [...]


    19. Watts' sparkling prose is the finger pointing at the moon of enlightenment, and while I'm super excited about that finger, it's also made me see the moon more clearly (if only for a few chapters) than I've ever seen it before. His explanation of the "double-bind" of ego-driven actions is perhaps the clearest and most succinct summary of this problem I've ever read.


    20. An excellent survey of eastern ways of liberation and its relationship to modern psychotherapy. I always enjoy reading Watts and this book is right up there with his best. Highly recomended!






    21. كتاب خيلي عالي بود و نكات بسيار عالي و بكري در آن مطرح شده بود كه خيلي از تناقضات را حل مي كند ولي ترجمه آن خيلي ثقيل بود و احتياج به صبر زيادي دارد تا از سر بالايي هاي آن رد شد اما من بدليل زمينه ها و تجارب شخصي خودم نظر نويسنده را خيلي خوب درك كردم در كل يكي از بهترين هايي بود كه [...]


    22. A book which compels me to look deeper into the social aspects of psychology from both sides of the box. The way in which he so thoroughly explains the waves and liberation of science and nature is beyond me and yet, I love it. That being said I love all of his works so far, this being the third one I've gotten my hands on.


    23. دنیایی که نویسنده می‌بیند، با پذیرش‌ها و کاستی‌های خاص خود، باز هم قابل نوشته‌شدن توسط او و خوانده‌شدن توسط ماست. او به خوبی می‌تواند گرایش‌های خود را کنار بزند و کتابی خارج از اتاق دربسته‌ی تعصب بنویسد.


    24. I liked this, but it definitely wasn't a quick read. I can't really say I got anything out of it except for a different understanding of Freud, and affirmation of some taoist beliefs that I have. I swear I'm not trying to sound pretentious


    25. Solid read. If you like this one, you might enjoy Sheldon Kopp's If You Meet the Buddha on the Road, Kill Him!; Rick Hanson's Buddha's Brain; or Mark Epstein's Thoughts Without a Thinker.


    26. lost track of this one in the hub bub of life, and i got kinda focused on "the road," by cormac mccarthy. almost done with that one. definitely worth shelving this one for another time though, it's very interesting material, even if it is a bit dated.


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