Step Across This Line: Collected Nonfiction 1992-2002

Step Across This Line: Collected Nonfiction 1992-2002

Salman Rushdie / Jun 05, 2020

Step Across This Line Collected Nonfiction Salman Rushdie Step Across This Line Collected Nonfiction New York Random House First edition Octavo pages From one of the great novelists of our day a vital brilliant new book o

  • Title: Step Across This Line: Collected Nonfiction 1992-2002
  • Author: Salman Rushdie
  • ISBN: 9780679463344
  • Page: 352
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Salman Rushdie Step Across This Line Collected Nonfiction 1992 2002 New York Random House, 2002 First edition Octavo 399 pages.From one of the great novelists of our day, a vital, brilliant new book of essays, speeches and articles essential for our times.Step Across This Line showcases the other side of one of fiction s most astonishing conjurors On display is SSalman Rushdie Step Across This Line Collected Nonfiction 1992 2002 New York Random House, 2002 First edition Octavo 399 pages.From one of the great novelists of our day, a vital, brilliant new book of essays, speeches and articles essential for our times.Step Across This Line showcases the other side of one of fiction s most astonishing conjurors On display is Salman Rushdie s incisive, thoughtful and generous mind, in prose that is as entertaining as it is topical The world is here, captured in pieces on a dazzling array of subjects from New York s Amadou Diallo case to the Wizard of Oz, from U2 to fifty years of Indian writing, from a tribute to Angela Carter to the struggle to film Midnight s Children The title essay was originally delivered at Yale as the 2002 Tanner lecture on human values, and examines the changing meaning of frontiers in the modern world moral and metaphorical frontiers as well as physical ones.The collection chronicles Rushdie s intellectual journeys, but it is also an intimate invitation into his life he explores his relationship to India through a moving diary of his first visit there in over a decade, A Dream of Glorious Return Step Across This Line also includes Messages From the Plague Years, a historic set of letters, articles and reflections on life under the fatwa Gathered together for the first time, this is Rushdie s humane, intelligent and angry response to a grotesque threat, aimed not just at him but at free expression itself.Step Across This Line, Salman Rushdie s first collection of non fiction in a decade, has the same energy, imagination and erudition as his astounding novels along with some very strong opinions.

    Step Across This Line Collected Nonfiction Step Across This Line concentrates in one volume Salman Rushdie s fierce intelligence, uncanny social commentary, and irrepressible wit about soccer, The Wizard of Oz, and writing, about fighting the Iranian fatwa and turning with the millennium, and about September , Ending with the eponymous, never before published speeches, this collection is, in Rushdie s words, a wake up call Step Across This Line by Salman Rushdie Step Across This Line also includes Messages From the Plague Years, a historic set of letters, articles and reflections on life under the fatwa Gathered together for the first time, this is Rushdie s humane, intelligent and angry response to a grotesque threat, aimed not just at him but at free expression itself. Step Across This Line Collected Nonfiction Step Across This Linealso includes Messages From the Plague Years, a historic set of letters, articles and reflections on life under the fatwa Gathered together for the first time, this is Rushdie s humane, intelligent and angry response to a grotesque threat, aimed not just at him but at free expression itself. Step Across This Line by Salman Rushdie Step Across This Line is a collection of Rushdie s many essays, journal entries and op ed pieces, and if you enjoy Rushdie s novels, you will likely appreciate his refreshing political perspective Rushdie is very reasonable, very down to earth, very humanitarian. Step Across this Line Salman Rushdie May , Step Across This Line concentrates in one volume Salman Rushdie s fierce intelligence, uncanny social commentary, and irrepressible wit about soccer, The Wizard of Oz, and writing, about fighting the Iranian fatwa and turning with the millennium, and about September , . Step Across This Line Summary eNotes Unlock This Study Guide Now Start your hour free trial to unlock this Step Across This Line study guide and get instant access to the following Summary Homework Help Question with Expert Step Across This Line Collected Nonfiction by Feb , Step Across This Line is Rushdie s latest chutney it produces an unfortunate indigestion in the reader who looks to an essay collection for different sustenance than a novel We require a certain reflective stance from a writer to whom we turn for direction, a detachment rendered impossible by the near synchronicity of event and response that characterizes so many of these pieces. step across the border YouTube Dec , Fred Frith Step Across the Border Full Album Duration Vicente Zamorano , views Fred Frith Friends Step Across The Border DVD Bonus Duration . to step across definition English We re about to step across the threshold of a new era UN The strategy and its action plan represent the government s commitment to take steps across many sectors of government and society to prevent and combat all forms of extremism. Why Do Soldiers Break Stride On A Bridge Live Science May , In April , a brigade of soldiers marched in step across England s Broughton Suspension Bridge According to accounts of the time, the bridge broke apart beneath the soldiers, throwing dozens

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      352 Salman Rushdie
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    About "Salman Rushdie"

      • Salman Rushdie

        Sir Ahmed Salman Rushdie is a novelist and essayist Much of his early fiction is set at least partly on the Indian subcontinent His style is often classified as magical realism, while a dominant theme of his work is the story of the many connections, disruptions and migrations between the Eastern and Western world.His fourth novel, The Satanic Verses, led to protests from Muslims in several countries, some of which were violent Faced with death threats and a fatwa religious edict issued by Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, then Supreme Leader of Iran, which called for him to be killed, he spent nearly a decade largely underground, appearing in public only sporadically In June 2007, he was appointed a Knight Bachelor for services to literature , which thrilled and humbled him In 2007, he began a five year term as Distinguished Writer in Residence at Emory University.


    304 Comments

    1. I finally returned to this book and decided to stop approaching it by doggedly slogging through the first 4/5ths of it in order to "earn" reading what I bought it for: what Rushie had to say after the Sept 11, 2001 attacks on the US. Boy am I glad I did. Here is a link to what he wrote in just the month following the attacks:randomhouse/boldtype/0One month later and he's already sorting through the heart of the matter, unflinchingly beginning even then to turn over stones what's under here? Salm [...]


    2. Somewhere in the course of this collection of his non-fiction works, Rushdie says, "[we] are like a child picking shells on the beach never noticing the huge ocean of magnificient beauty right in front of it". I sit mesmerized, looking around myself in awe, wondering where to start and where to end. When there is so much to know, so much that intrigues and so much that enraptures, there is sometimes a real danger of absorbing nothing or worse, wasting one's time in indecision. This book is like [...]


    3. Rushdie has been hit or miss for me. I devoured Haroun and the Sea of Stories; savored Shalimar the Clown and The Ground Beneath Her Feet. but I can't seem to make myself get into Midnight's Children, I try and I stall. I've read about have of The Moor's Last Sigh and don't really mind that I don't know how it ends. I've ceased to expect much from Rushdie aside from his wonderful prose. Maybe I'll be drawn in to the story, maybe not. Before reading this I'd never attempted his nonfiction, I'm no [...]


    4. This is a collection of various Rushdie pieces, broadly about India, Islam, America and literary topics; through the fatwa years and after 9/11. The easy humor Rushdie finds in terrible times is disarming. The final essay about frontiers, with evocative passages on what it means to straddle frontiers with an unwanted passport, is poignant, as is the essay on his homecoming to India after the fatwa controversy cooled. With the benefit of hindsight, one often finds the cosmopolitan liberalism info [...]


    5. Salman Rushdie is one of my favorite authors. This book of essays gives his thoughts on a wide variety of subjects. I especially was interested in the section including his descriptions of his life under the fatwa.I want to include some quotes from the book. The first is a precious description of the TaJ Mahal, something agreed to be pretty much indescribable."I had been skeptical about the visit. One of the legends of the Taj is that the hands of the master masons who built it were cut off by t [...]


    6. от Салман Рушді у доволі непоганому, але якось надто рівному есе Ще раз на захист роману, пише: Бо література - справжня література - завжди була надбанням меншості. все вірно, але я ніяк не можу скласти конструкт "справжня література". та, яка лікує? очищає? чи, як пише Рушді у [...]


    7. I previous enjoyed reading Salman Rushdie’s first book of essays Imaginary Homelands, so I thought I would also read Step Across This Line: Collected Essays from 1992-2002. I also enjoyed many of the essays in this volume, however, many of them were concerned with personal freedom and Islam due to this experience of having gone underground to avoid the fatawa that was on his head-which is completely understandable given the situation. However, some of his points are repeated too frequently in [...]


    8. Oh my. This is the first of Rushdie's writing I've read. I read it in bits and pieces over the course of a week, staying with a friend up in the Northwest Territories. The essays were brilliant, each one thought-provoking, readable without being dumbed-down, and witty. Likewise, the fourth section pieces on frontiers and ideas - incredible, and absolutely warrant a re-read (or three) at a later point in time. I knew only the basic details of the 'Rushdie affair' before I started this, so I found [...]


    9. Bought this basically for the huge, enormous, gigantic essay on the Wizard of Oz which I read in the New Yorker when it came out, marveling at each turn of the page how it just went on and on and on. (There was an equally huge, enormous, gigantic essay -- not at the same time -- on Judy Garland's entire ouvre. I forget who wrote it. Probably Anthony Lane. .nh, nope. (I have both those issues, somewhere, moldering and yellow, in a box. In a closet. Decaying slowly in the dark.)


    10. The only previous exposure (other than popular media) I'd had was the excellent (and sadly OOP) audiobook version ofHaroun and the Sea of Stories, read by the author. So far, this book a wide-ranging collection of essays, speeches & articles. Some have been more engaging than others (his look at the movie version of The Wizard of Oz was fascinating!), but I'm generally enjoying it & feel more comfortable about moving on to some of his fiction. I did start feeling a bit of "fatwa fatigue" [...]


    11. One of the most important collection of essays I have ever read. He covers a wide range of topics (soccer, movies, writers, political movements, his own fatwa, India, America, etc) but his values never falter. Always he will return to the concept of freedom; what is freedom? What does it look like? Do we value it? How can we protect it? Freedom of speech and the arts. Freedom of and from religion. Freedom from political or economic or philosophical oppression. It all ties together and it all mat [...]


    12. Fabulous to see Rushdie the essayist in peak form here. Throbbing with candour and erudition, the collection offers pieces that are at times prescient, at times personal, at times deliberative and then some carefree notes-to-self that collectively offer a wide-ranging, decade-long snapshot from an intellectual engaged sincerely with politics, literature and world affairs. Having read his autobiography Joseph Anton before, the middle section containing pieces from his fatwa years held little sway [...]


    13. Rushdie has a flair for painting with words, or cooking them into a sumptuous meal. But he flounders when it comes to political commentary. His view of geopolitics has that Occidental tone of the "civilizing West" vs. "to-be-civilized East", and his analysis of contemporary affairs is one dimensional. However, he is a master chef of literature and literary criticism, and perhaps, he should stick to his cuisine.


    14. This collection opens with an interminable, overreaching, boring essay on the Wizard of Oz and closes with a smart, insightful, wide-ranging essay on the idea frontier. The filler in between is mediocre and mostly about what it's like to be Salman Rushdie.Snap.


    15. This book is a collection of articles and essays. Articles on terrorism and freedom were the ones I found most interesting. These were mainly contained in Section II - Messages From the Plague Years. Most of Section One did not hold my interest.A few good quotes:"Moral stature is a rare quality in these degraded days. Very few writers possess it. Miller’s seems innate but was much increased because he was able to learn from his mistakes. Like Günter Grass, who was brought up in a Nazi househo [...]


    16. Sir Salmon Rushdie is one of my most favorite, still living writers. The famous and illegal fatwa against him is by now a residual threat. It was declared at some point during the writing of the collection of essays in: Step Across this Line. Remembering how real this threat was and how readily some folks wanted to blame the victim add to the poignancy of this volume.Introduction done These are wonderful essays. As the title suggests the essays are about the many kinds of borders a person can cr [...]


    17. I read, no, make that "devoured," his first collection of essays, Imaginary Homelands: Essays and Criticism 1981-1991 and loved every word of it. It struck me as a potpourri of subjects, each essay different from its neighbors. This book seems to be a lot of writing about the same subjects. The writing is clear, and enjoyable, but for me, too much almost repetition on a topic. I loved the first section, enjoyed the other sections, started all of the penultimate section—didn't finish most of th [...]


    18. Rushdie has an enviable body of work, into which he's breathed his vast, vivifying wit, clarity, and intelligence; at once worldly and place-bound, parochial and universal, his writings - novels, essays, etc. - have continuously enraptured me ever since I came across his name at the beginning of my third decade. I would like nothing more than to spend a week with him in India, so that I may be strictly, categorically humbled by my ignorance of it; as he writes in his essay on the Taj Mahal, I wo [...]



    19. This is a collection of essays and opinion columns encompassing Salman Rushdie's arrival in New York and his continuing work as a novelist and critic.His essay on The Wizard of Oz is a beautiful piece, written as a migrant and a father, in which he explores "one final, unexpected rite of passage," when we must inevitably disappoint the expectations of our child and be exposed - like the wizard as portrayed by Frank Morgan - as humbugs.At times, Rushdie's thought seems constrained by double stand [...]


    20. I really enjoyed this, because Rushdie's writing is so fluid and witty and easy to read, and because he touches on so many different subjects in this book. This is all essays and columns and stuff, and he really runs the gamut, there's a great piece that's his analysis of "The Wizard of Oz", from an adult standpoint but fully admitting that it was the first movie to ever really make a big impression on him so he's a big fan. It's intellectual and not, which makes it fun; he gets into the geometr [...]


    21. This is Salman Rushdie's second collection of essays, which range from 1992 to 2002. Like his first collection Imaginary Homelands, I do not think that this is essentially reading for anyone but dedicated Rushdie fans, but the collection stands out as a commentary on Rushdie's place in the current literary scene.For ultimately what pervades this collection is a sense of desperation. During the early 1990s Rushdie didn't want to speak about the controversy of The Satanic Verses and the fatwa, pre [...]


    22. With great power comes great responsibility, goes the saying. In case of great writers, the power they exercise also provides great opportunities to make people listen (or in this case read) to everything they say or write. Rushdie, literary giant in his own right, seems to exercises this great power in this collection of non fiction that is littered with gems, but is let down by what seems like mostly filler material.Divided into 4 parts, the first part is by far the best with Rushdie discussin [...]


    23. This is sort of a strange and eclectic collection, encompassing small journalistic pieces on popular music and cinema, longer essays on literature and politics, and messages "from the plague years," i.e his seclusion in protective custody due to Ayatollah Khomeini's fatwa for The Satanic Verses. Across all of these forms and genres, Rushdie combines his vast cultural knowledge with witty turns of phrase that never sound condescending or "high-brow."I call this volume "strange," though, because o [...]


    24. I'm an absolute fan of Salman Rushdie, and my intention to (eventually) make my way through everything he's written. That was the motivation behind picking up 'Step Across This Line'.Even though this isn't fiction, you recognize Rushdie's ideas, his comfort with being opinionated and even his imagination fairly quickly. Much like in Joseph Antoine, I often found myself interested in how colourfully he seemed to view an event, for instance, that I saw mostly in greys. That process I enjoyed thoro [...]


    25. O livro de ensaios do aclamado autor de Versos Satânicos é uma preciosa coleção de textos que lançam luzes sobre a genialidade de um autor e sua obra. Os assuntos variam muito entre si e se revelam atuais, quase atemporais, apesar do fato de que alguns dos textos foram escritos muitos anos atrás. Ali se encontram ensaios sobre outros escritores, sobre filmes, livros, enfim: impressões argutas e bem-humoradas do autor sobre diversos temas. Destaque especial é dado para uma seção com tex [...]


    26. I read only half of Rushdie's "Fury", because the novel felt more like an editorial with plot. "Fury" was the last novel I tried to read, switching this year to nonfiction alone. "Step Across This Line" is a collection of Rushdie's many essays, journal entries and op-ed pieces, and if you enjoy Rushdie's novels, you will likely appreciate his refreshing political perspective. Rushdie is very reasonable, very down-to-earth, very humanitarian. His analysis is vivifying; his knowledge of world affa [...]


    27. This is a book to take time over. The many, many essays each deserve attention: so it is foolish to swish through them. Rushdie gives you so much to think about in each essay, that you need to read it, put the book down and then think a bit. SO it's best read one essay at a time, one day at a time.That's how they were published initially, so that makes sense for the reader too. Unlike a compilation of short stories, Rushdie talks here directly to the reader about political and social issues that [...]


    28. In general, I like Rushdie's thinking, both in fiction and nonfiction form, but this collection of essays mostly just didn't do it for me. I by no means state this as any sort of definitive fact: Definitely don't take my word for it. Some of the essays were interesting, but I'd already read a lot of his writing on the fatwa, which he explores in considerably more depth in his memoirs Joseph Anton, and a lot of the other essays were simply on topics that didn't interest me: literary criticism of [...]


    29. Why didn't I read Salman Rushdie sooner?? The first essay in this collection sold me on him immediately. It's a fun, interesting discussion of The Wizard of Oz, his experience with the movie, the making of the movie, its symbolismMy favourite quote:"What [Dorothy] embodies . . . is the human dream of leaving, a dream at least as powerful as the countervailing dream of roots . . . this is unarguably a film about the joys of going away, of leaving the greyness and entering the color, of making a n [...]


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