Sette giorni fra mille anni

Sette giorni fra mille anni

Robert Graves / May 29, 2020

Sette giorni fra mille anni In una lettera a James Reeves del maggio Graves chiaro sul senso di Sette giorni fra mille anni Riguarda il problema del male quanto male necessario per una buona vita Nel mondo di Nuova Creta c

  • Title: Sette giorni fra mille anni
  • Author: Robert Graves
  • ISBN: 9788874525379
  • Page: 115
  • Format: Paperback
  • In una lettera a James Reeves del maggio 1949 Graves chiaro sul senso di Sette giorni fra mille anni Riguarda il problema del male quanto male necessario per una buona vita Nel mondo di Nuova Creta, che capitolo dopo capitolo diventa per Graves sempre meno accettabile, il problema che c sempre una nostalgia del male , come scrive, in un altra lettera, quand In una lettera a James Reeves del maggio 1949 Graves chiaro sul senso di Sette giorni fra mille anni Riguarda il problema del male quanto male necessario per una buona vita Nel mondo di Nuova Creta, che capitolo dopo capitolo diventa per Graves sempre meno accettabile, il problema che c sempre una nostalgia del male , come scrive, in un altra lettera, quand a un terzo della stesura Se l utopia scientifica il bersaglio di Huxley nel Mondo nuovo e quella comunista l obiettivo di Orwell in 1984, forse non c un bersaglio di questa distopia che non sia proprio l utopia Il vero male sta nell immaginare che i problemi si risolvano Solo il passato elargisce futuro Solo il dolore crea a e solo la sventura regala saggezza Senza il male non c poesia Lo scrittore un seme di dolore, che dona al lettore un raccolto di dolore, facendogli coltivare cos saggezza e a.

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    About "Robert Graves"

      • Robert Graves

        Robert Ranke Graves, born in Wimbledon, received his early education at King s College School and Copthorne Prep School, Wimbledon Charterhouse School and won a scholarship to St John s College, Oxford While at Charterhouse in 1912, he fell in love with G H Johnstone, a boy of fourteen Dick in Goodbye to All That When challenged by the headmaster he defended himself by citing Plato, Greek poets, Michelangelo Shakespeare, who had felt as I did At the outbreak of WWI, Graves enlisted almost immediately, taking a commission in the Royal Welch Fusiliers He published his first volume of poems, Over the Brazier, in 1916 He developed an early reputation as a war poet and was one of the first to write realistic poems about his experience of front line conflict In later years he omitted war poems from his collections, on the grounds that they were too obviously part of the war poetry boom At the Battle of the Somme he was so badly wounded by a shell fragment through the lung that he was expected to die, and indeed was officially reported as died of wounds He gradually recovered Apart from a brief spell back in France, he spent the rest of the war in England.One of Graves s closest friends at this time was the poet Siegfried Sassoon, who was also an officer in the RWF In 1917 Sassoon tried to rebel against the war by making a public anti war statement Graves, who feared Sassoon could face a court martial, intervened with the military authorities and persuaded them that he was suffering from shell shock, and to treat him accordingly Graves also suffered from shell shock, or neurasthenia as it is sometimes called, although he was never hospitalised for it.Biographers document the story well It is fictionalised in Pat Barker s novel Regeneration The intensity of their early relationship is nowhere demonstrated clearly than in Graves s collection Fairies Fusiliers 1917 , which contains a plethora of poems celebrating their friendship Through Sassoon, he also became friends with Wilfred Owen, whose talent he recognised Owen attended Graves s wedding to Nancy Nicholson in 1918, presenting him with, as Graves recalled, a set of 12 Apostle spoons.Following his marriage and the end of the war, Graves belatedly took up his place at St John s College, Oxford He later attempted to make a living by running a small shop, but the business failed In 1926 he took up a post at Cairo University, accompanied by his wife, their children and the poet Laura Riding He returned to London briefly, where he split with his wife under highly emotional circumstances before leaving to live with Riding in Dei , Majorca There they continued to publish letterpress books under the rubric of the Seizin Press, founded and edited the literary journal Epilogue, and wrote two successful academic books together A Survey of Modernist Poetry 1927 and A Pamphlet Against Anthologies 1928.In 1927, he published Lawrence and the Arabs, a commercially successful biography of T.E Lawrence Good bye to All That 1929, revised and republished in 1957 proved a success but cost him many of his friends, notably Sassoon In 1934 he published his most commercially successful work, I, Claudius Using classical sources he constructed a complexly compelling tale of the life of the Roman emperor Claudius, a tale extended in Claudius the God 1935 Another historical novel by Graves, Count Belisarius 1938 , recounts the career of the Byzantine general Belisarius.During the early 1970s Graves began to suffer from increasingly severe memory loss, and by his eightieth birthday in 1975 he had come to the end of his working life By 1975 he had published than 140 works He survived for ten years in an increasingly dependent condition until he died from heart failure.


    244 Comments

    1. I don't often read the blurb on the back of a book before reading because, if I trust a recommendation to read a book in the first place, then I prefer to know as little as possible about it in advance. However, I didn't pick this up on a recommendation; rather I stumbled upon it in a library. Too often the blurb on the back can throw spoilers at you that I would rather avoid but that was not the case this time, quite the opposite. It lead me to expect something rather different from what I got. [...]


    2. Judging from other Graves' works, I expected this book to be too dreamy and serious for its own good. I was astonished to see that I was wrong. The story flows without the reader even noticing it, and the writing is playful. I read it in one sitting and was thirsty for more.With this book, Graves is coming back to the his favourite theme of the Goddess and dreams of a Utopia without wars, money and crime. An attractive perspective, but, like every other Utopia, it's too good to be true, and the [...]


    3. This is a profoundly stupid book. The problem, that is, the thing that makes it so stupid, is that Robert Graves, as will be well known to anyone who has ploughed their way through 'The White Goddess' or any of his other extraordinary Goddess-influenced works, was a man of strong convictions, who had no use for any form of reason, doubt or introspection. And so, in this book, which purports to be yet another in the series of literary anti-utopians, what strikes one most is not the reflected crit [...]


    4. The plot, insofar as it matters: A 20th century poet is whisked into the future (which values poets) and learns about their society.Apparently a rule of thumb is that one ought to read 50 pages before abandoning a book (and the equivalent of your age, I'm told, if you're older than 50). And I certainly read 50+ pages before returning this to the library, even after being a bit put out at the rather casual condemnation of homosexuals (this society puts them to death) and the comparison with two-h [...]


    5. Se il male venisse bandito dalla nostra società, esisterebbe il bene? È attorno a questa domanda che ruota il romanzo di Graves, che per rispondere invia un suo alter ego in un futuro lontano, nella pacifica e amena società di Nuova Creta. La lettura è piacevole, intrisa di simbolismo e rimandi a La Dea Bianca, saggio di pochi anni anteriore, ma anche di momenti divertenti, quasi comici. Per molti versi mi ha ricordato Uno yankee alla corte di Re Artù: stesso intento dissacratorio, sia nei [...]


    6. I am enjoying reading this. However, it's a little tto dense in the physical writing - a longer book with larger print would be nicer. I will pick it up again in a while, but I have other things to read right now


    7. I really tried to read this, but it was just too much of a loose wander. And it was boring, which is never good in something you expect to entertain you.




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